Seborrheic keratosis (also known as 'seborrheic verruca,' and 'senile wart') is a noncancerous benign skin growth that originates in keratinocytes. Like liver spots, seborrheic keratoses are seen more often as people age. In fact, they are sometimes humorously referred to as the 'barnacles of old age'.
The lesions appear in various colors, from light tan to black. They are round or oval, feel flat or slightly elevated (like the scab from a healing wound), and range in size from very small to more than 2.5 centimetres (1 in) across. They can resemble warts, though they have no viral origins. They can also resemble melanoma skin cancer, though they are unrelated to melanoma.
  Seborrheic keratoses are normally painless and require no treatment. You may decide, however, to have them removed if they become irritated by clothing or for cosmetic reasons.
SYMPTOMS

A seborrheic keratosis usually has the appearance of a waxy or wart-like growth. It typically appears on the face, chest, shoulders or back of the body. A seborrheic keratosis:

Ranges in color, usually from light tan to brown or black
Is round or oval shaped
Has a characteristic "pasted on" look
Is flat or slightly elevated with a scaly surface
Ranges in size from very small to more than 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) across
May itch
You may develop a single growth or cluster of growths. Though not painful, seborrheic keratoses may prove bothersome depending on their size and location. Be careful not to rub, scratch or pick them. This can lead to inflammation, bleeding and, in rare cases, infection.
CAUSES

The exact cause of seborrheic keratoses isn't known. They are very common and generally increase in number with age. They tend to run in some families, so inheritance may play a role.

Diagnosis
Visual diagnosis is made by the 'stuck on' appearance, horny pearls or cysts embedded in the structure. Darkly pigmented lesions can  be hard to distinguish from nodular melanomas. If in doubt, a skin biopsy should be performed. Thin seborrheic keratoses on facial skin can be very difficult to differentiate from lentigo maligna even with dermatoscopy.
Clinically, epidermal nevi are similar to seborrheic keratoses in appearance. Epidermal nevi are usually present at or near birth. Condylomas and warts can clinically resemble seborrheic keratoses, and dermatoscopy can be helpful. On the penis and genital skin, condylomas and seborrheic keratoses can be difficult to differentiate, even on biopsy.

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